#38 – Walk On The Wild Side

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As I press on through National Novel Writing Month (behind schedule), two concepts recently explored in BriteLites synergize.

One: Write a Mission Statement for the novel of about twelve words.
Plus
One: Know that: If there’s a book you really want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet,
then you must write it.
Equals
I have never started a poem yet whose end I knew.
Robert Frost

With NaNo nearly two-thirds finished, I give up on the notion of directing this story. Characters have been constructed. But what my practical-planning mind produced has been replaced by intuitive impressions insisting that I forget about leading and follow.
I surrender! As long as these characters reach Martha’s Vineyard and generate some drama-trauma that is resolved, the journey keeps dissolving my concerns about a 50,000-word pile of pulp. The need to know what happens next trumps.

Guy de Maupassant

Through this series that revisits 19th century authors, BriteLitesBiz invites discussion of topics that remain important to WordSmiths. The intro stated,

Although Henry James one time observed that “in dissertation M. de Maupassant does not write with his best pen,” this discussion of the novel is one of the few really lucid essays on the subject.

Thank goodness!

Critiquing the Critic, Part 3 of 5

All writers, Victor Hugo as well as M. Zola, have claimed with persistence the absolute, indisputable right of composing, that is to say imagining or observing, according to their personal conception of art.  Talent springs from originality, which is a special manner of thinking, of seeing, of understanding, and of judging.

Now the critic who presumes to define the novel according to the idea he has formed from the novels he likes, and to establish certain invariable rules of composition, will always war against the artistic temperament that introduces a new manner.  A critic, if he is really to merit the name, should be only an analyst, without bias, without preferences, without passions; and, like a critic of pictures, should consider only the artistic value of the object of art submitted to him.  His comprehension, open to every impression, ought to absorb his personality so completely that he can discover and praise the very books which he does not like as a man and must evaluate as a judge.

But most critics are, in truth, only readers, from which fact it results that they nearly always reprove us on false grounds, or compliment us without reserve and without measure.

Worth A Look

In each issue, BriteLitesBiz presents a video specially selected to inspire, motivate, enlighten and prompt WordSmithing.

This trailer for the film adaptation of Nelson Algren’s marvelous novel is a study in metaphor set to award-winning music.

Nominate a video for “Worth A Look.” When selected, receive
art featured in Sandra’s Gallery.

Support BriteLites

Each week, BriteLitesBiz delivers information and inspiration for WordSmiths.

Support by shopping in my galleries where the art can be purchased, either as prints for less than  $20 or custom framed. Note the Weekly Specials.
BriteLites can also be supported with a $20 gift.  Thank you.
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# 37 – A Portrait of You

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It takes courage to grow up and turn out to be who you really are.
e.e.cummings

After watching Dr. Phil’s show about a mother who hates her daughter, I learned that most who are in (or could benefit from) therapy have been raised by mothers who couldn’t care.   That said, The Boston Globe describes a life-changing, aha! moment:

As parents, we know we aren’t perfect. Our children, however, think we
are, at least when they are young. Depending on how and when we fall off our pedestal, their reaction can range from mild disappointment to intense anger.  From their perspective, we have let them down, and that is no small thing
.

That let down is not as big as realizing – eventually – that fallible human beings have told us who and what we are (and actions can speak way louder than words).

No matter the dimness or lights in portraits that others have painted of us, I think that e. e. cummings was right about discovering and defending the best of who we are as we keep growing up.

Question:  What are the best and brightest things that are true about me?

Affirmation:  I enjoy being my best friend and chief cheerleader.  Source.

WORTH A LOOK

Each week, SoulSongz searches the internet for videos that can inspire, uplift and motivate.  Why not draw a self portrait using this 2-minute guide?  And, as the artist recommends, keep tweaking the portrait until you see your best friend and chief cheerleader.  (Click on the paint brush.)
Nominate videos for SoulSongz’s “Worth A Look.”   When selected, receive art featured in  Sandra’s Gallery.
“The Left and The Right Of It”
Support SoulSongzTSTL 6
Each week, SoulSongz delivers lovely art and enriching information.
Support by clicking on the image and visiting galleries where my art can be purchased, either as prints for less than $20 or custom framed.  Note the Weekly Specials.
SoulSongz can also be supported with a $20 gift.  Thank you.   Payments

#36 Painting

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I dream my painting and paint my dream.
Vincent van Gogh

As an urban dweller, I seldom think about – let alone see – big sky.  A couple years ago, I followed the Colorado River as it meandered from the Rockies and through Utah’s Canyonlands.  Along the way, I experienced vast.  The main problem, looking back, was that I assessed, framed and photographed, but didn’t really breathe deep and savor.  Thank goodness pictures can remind.

Question:  What could happen when a great big picture of tomorrow is painted?

Affirmation:  I will win in all that I do and look forward to succeeding.     Source

WORTH A LOOK


26 minutes

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Gangsterdom

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Dear BriteLites Supporter,
The regular mailing is rescheduled for mid-week.   Please watch for the continuation of Guy de Maupassant’s discussion of critics and the novel, a WordSmith video and notes on succeeding in National Novel Writing Month.
In the meantime, Word Witty returns.  Your thoughts, as always, are welcomed.
Sandra Gould Ford

Word Witty encourages a love of language and is especially for Educators, Wordsmiths & Word Gamers.

Herbert Bayer said, “The limits of my language mean the limits of my world.” Word Witty adds: The broader our vocabularies, the bigger our worlds, the vaster our communicating tools and Scrabble scores.

GANGSTERDOM

GANG (on board) + DEOMRST (use all 7 tiles in rack for 50-point bonus) =
GANGSTERDOM
(OWL2 approved)

According to Webster’s OnLine Dictionary and The Free Dictionary Online:

•a member of an organized group of criminals, a racketeer
•gangsterism, racketeering, thuggery, brigandage
•delinquency, offence, crime, fault, misdemeanor, guilt


6 minutes

What are your thoughts on this list of Top Ten Gangster Movies?
What would you change?

(I was expecting New Jack City)

SUPPORT BRITELITES

Each week, BriteLitesBiz delivers information and inspiration for WordSmiths.

 Support by  shopping in my galleries where the art can be purchased, either as prints for less than  $20 or custom framed. Note the Weekly Specials.

BriteLites can also be supported with a $20 gift.  Thank you.
Payments
Also visit SoulSongz, my blog that presents art for healing and high achievement. Current Theme, “The Sky’s The Limit.”

Prep for NaNo Month – Step 4 & Goal Setting

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Prep for National Novel Writing Month – 4th Steps

Thirty days and nights of literary abandon. About 100 novels have been published from NanoWriMo efforts. See the list.

Okay, NaNoWriMo starts Thursday!  If you’d like to try drafting a 50,000-word novel in November, register here.

Scenes

The night was dank and dreary (hmmmm). Frankenstein-green light drenched the tired and quiet bus riders. Across from me, a woman clutched a book so closely that I thought she’d either eat it or squeeze inside. When I asked what she was reading, she replied, “Half Blood Prince,” the sixth Harry Potter novel.
Because I knew that one important character died, I asked, “Was it Hagrid?” To my surprise, everyone on the bus perked up and eavesdropped. Conversations about Potter erupted. And I wondered, How did Rowling do it?
Paying careful attention to the last book, Deathly Hallows, I realized that J. K. Rowling enraptured readers with her mastery of The Scene, which is:
  • A Setting (either implicit or explicit), with
  • Two or more characters
  • Interacting in ways that propel the story toward the next scene

Scenes are different from exposition: explanations, observations and introspective passages. Consider concentrating on scenes during NaNoWriMo. Keep asking: What happens? What happens next?

Tracking

A log or process for recalling what has been written and where it is will prove most helpful (and reduce hair pulling), especially after about 50 pages of “literary abandon.” Mine is available for $15. 

Buy Now

Worth A Look  

In each issue, BriteLitesBiz presents a video specially selected to inspire, motivate, enlighten and prompt WordSmithing.  This issue’s 5-minute video presents a seven-step sequence for achieving goals.

Nominate a video for “Worth A Look.”  When selected, receive art featured in Sandra’s gallery.

Support BriteLitesBiz

TSTL 5 Each week, BriteLitesBiz delivers information and inspiration for WordSmiths.

Support by clicking on the image and shopping in my galleries where the art can be purchased, either as prints for less than  $20 or custom framed. Note the Weekly Specials.
BriteLites can also be supported with a $20 gift.  Thank you
Payments
Also visit SoulSongz, my blog that presents art for healing and high achievement.  This Issue:  #35 – Boo!  Possibilities.  “You Deserve.”
Thanks for visiting!

#35 – Boo! Possibilities & "You Deserve" video

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Become a possibilitarian. No matter how dark  things seem to be or actually are, raise your sights and see possibilities – always see  them, for they’re always there.
Norman Vincent Peale

When I was in tenth grade, we lived on a lonely hilltop surrounded by apple and pear, cherry and peach trees.  One gray afternoon, as I strode from the kitchen, as I expected the dining room to open before me, a monstrous form hovered above the door.  I was so horrified, I fell flat on my back (so much for the fright-flight response).

My kid sister never said, “Boo!”  And I think she was too shocked at how discombobulated I was to laugh … right away.  Nowadays,  recalling that humiliating and offensive incident, I think of how Zig Ziglar explained that “fear” is an acronym for False Evidence Appearing Real.

If I’d looked up, I’d have seen my sister standing on that furniture, arching her arms and wriggling her fingers in that stupid,  “Creature From The Black Lagoon” imitation.  If I’d looked up.  If.

A Question:    What scares me these days?

An Affirmation:  Every breath I inhale calms me.  Every breath I exhale takes away tension and open a space for brighter possibilities.   Source

Worth A Look

Each week, SoulSongz searches the internet for videos that can inspire, uplift and motivate.  This 48-minute presentation was one of the most popular on PBS.  SoulSongz hopes that it inspires smiles as well as great ideas.

Nominate videos for SoulSongz’s “Worth A Look.”   When selected, receive art featured in Sandra’s gallery.

Critiquing Critics

BriteLitesBiz, Information & Inspiration for WordSmiths

 This week, 18th century author Guy de Maupassant critiques critics.  This week, BriteLites will also offer final preparations for November’s National Novel Writing Month.  Visit BriteLitesBiz.

Support SoulSongz

Each week, SoulSongz delivers lovely art and enriching information.  Support by visiting Sandra’s galleries where her art can be purchased, either as prints for less than $20 or custom framed.  Note the Weekly Specials.
SoulSongz can also be supported with a $20 gift.  Thank you.   Payments

#36 Critiquing Critics – de Maupassant Pt 1

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Guy de Maupassant

Through this series that revisits 19th century authors, BriteLitesBiz invites discussion of topics that remain important to WordSmiths. The intro stated,

Although Henry James one time observed that “in dissertation M. de Maupassant does not write with his best pen,” this discussion of the novel is one of the few really lucid essays on the subject.

Thank goodness!   And — symbolically — deMaupassant lambasts more than those who publish opinions about books.

*

From de Maupassant’s introduction to Pierre et Jean.

In the midst of eulogistic sentences I find regularly this one, by the same pen:  “The greatest fault in this work is that it is not a novel, properly speaking.”

One could reply by the same argument:  “The greatest fault in the writer who does me the honor to judge my work is that he is not a critic.”

What are, in truth, the essential characteristics of the critic?

Without prejudice, without preconceived opinions, without the ideas of a school, without affiliations with any special group of artists, he must understand, distinguish, and explain all tendencies the most opposite, temperaments the most contrary, and acknowledge artistic innovations of the most diverse character.

Now the critic who after Manon Lescaut, Paul et Virginie, Don Quixote, Les Liaisons Dangereuses, Werther … Madame Bovary, Adolphe, M. de Camors, L’Assommoir, Sapho, etc., dares still to write “This is a novel and that is not,” seems to me to be endowed with a perspicacity which strongly resembles incompetence.

Ordinarily the critic understands by “novel” an adventure more or less probable, arranged in the fashion of a drama in three acts, of which the first contains the exposition, the second the action, and the third the denouement.

This manner of composing is absolutely admissible on condition that one accept equally all the others.

Do rules exist for writing a novel, outside of which a written narrative ought to bear some other name?

To be continued

Mid Week, Watch for:

4th Step in Preparing for National Novel Writing Month

Setting Achievable Goals (a Zig video)

Be sure to visit my SoulSongz blog with the autumn theme, “The Sky’s The Limit.”
Boo!

Support BriteLites with a $20 gift.  Thank you.
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